Meet Carrie Grip, Rebuilding Together’s 2013 Executive Director of the Year

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Photo courtesy of Malia Rae Photography

Meet Carrie Grip of Rebuilding Together Sacramento, the 2013 Executive Director of the Year. Carrie joined Rebuilding Together Sacramento in 1999 as its first staff member, and has led the affiliate ever since as the organization’s only executive director.

She first learned about Rebuilding Together through the tech company she was working with at the time. The company was working with the local Sacramento affiliate for one of their community service projects. Carrie was asked to manage a rebuild day, and from then on, she was hooked.

When Carrie heard that the local all-volunteer affiliate was seeking to hire their first paid executive director, she went for it. She knew what it would take: she’d worked a rebuilding day from the sponsor end as a volunteer coordinator and had a good idea of how such an event came together. She knew it would be hard work, but also that it would be well worth it.

What kind of work draws someone in and keeps them on board year after year? When we asked Carrie to share a moment that shows what her work is all about, she described a wonderful woman whose home Rebuilding Together Sacramento rebuilt. The homeowner was very active in her community and “everyone loved her,” said Carrie. Two hundred volunteers came together through a big church in the area to help rebuild their beloved neighbor’s home. The homeowner didn’t see any of the work in progress, and when she was brought in for the big reveal tour, Carrie remembers her crying with joy and gratitude as she looked around her newly safe and healthy home. The most memorable moment came, perhaps surprisingly, when they got to the bathroom. The homeowner reached down into the bathtub and turned on the faucet. As she stuck her hand under the stream of warm water, she said, “This is the first time I’ve had hot water for ten years.” This beloved friend to all, who baked pies and looked after neighborhood children, had been heating water on her stove and carrying it to the bathroom in pots to fill her tub and bathe for a decade. The image of her hand under the water is vivid in Carrie’s memory to this day.

That’s the kind of impact every Rebuilding Together project has on the safety and health of homeowners nationwide. You might not see such transformation from the outside of the house, but it makes all the difference in the world of each homeowner served. This homeowner lived without water behind closed doors, and Rebuilding Together Sacramento ensured that her home was made safe and healthy. That’s the kind of work that keeps people like Carrie, who are passionate, skilled and giving, hooked on the work we do together.

Carrie’s nominator described her as “very hands on and open minded with all management and employee situations…the phrase ‘can’t do’ is not in her vocabulary. If there is an opportunity that will benefit her affiliate, she goes for it with spirit and enthusiasm that rubs off on the rest of the team. Her dedication creates immense loyalty.”

“I love the organization,” she said. “I think what we’re doing is great. It’s something that’s valuable, unique, rewarding and badly needed.” Carrie is happy to come to work every day, which she says is “really special.” She feels blessed to work with the volunteers and staff we work with on a daily basis. “You get attached to people who work at affiliates,” she says. “They’re such great people, and we learn so much from one another.” In her earlier days, she also enjoyed the flexible hours that allowed her to spend time raising her daughter. She happily recalled her daughter roller skating around the Rebuilding Together warehouse and helping to fold t-shirts. Fourteen years after joining Rebuilding Together Sacramento, Carrie is still as glad to be here as she was then: “I still like it, there’s still more to do.” She feels very motivated by what we do, and the potential she sees around the network. She is excited by the new things that are always happening, and wants to see what more we can accomplish and how we can grow.

Carrie has followed her vision of a full service housing agency, and has led great growth at Rebuilding Together Sacramento. Thanks to her hard work and commitment, Rebuilding Together Sacramento has grown from a $100,000 budget a $1.3 million budget, with an impact of 4,230 projects valued at $14 million, and from two to five highly successful programs. As a Rebuilding Together thought leader, Carrie is at the table helping to shape Rebuilding Together, Inc.’s Foundation for the Future under our new President and CEO Charley Shimanski in addition to her work at Rebuilding Together Sacramento. While Carrie received her award back in November at our National Conference in Washington, DC, we would like to take this opportunity to thank her again for her dedication and service, and congratulate her on this well-deserved honor!

Would you like to kick off the New Year by helping a homeowner in need? Just visit rebuildingtogether.org/help/ to get started today.

Meet Graham MacDonald!
Graham is Rebuilding Together’s research and policy specialist, working in the Government Affairs Department. 
He grew up in a small rural community called Quincy in Illinois. Graham then went on to study public policy at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In fact, he’s one of a few UNC alumni in Rebuilding Together’s national office.
Graham currently lives in Washington, D.C. He said his favorite spot is Meridian Hill Park. But if he isn’t enjoying the views there, you can probably find this big music fan in his kitchen or listening to music through his favorite speakers. 
Graham said that policy making has always been an interest of his. While never really knowing anyone who did policy work for a living, Graham’s family was very politically engaged. 
Last summer, Graham started as Rebuilding Together’s research and policy intern. “I loved the internship,” Graham said. “It gave me great experience on The Hill.  I got to taste everything Rebuilding Together does.”
Graham became the research and policy specialist just a few months ago. “I like it a lot,” said Graham. “I get the policy and research experience. I get to experience project planning and inviting elected officials to projects.” Graham was even able to sit down with Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) and talk about Rebuilding Together’s mission. 
His first time being a part of the revitalization side of Rebuilding Together happened this past National Rebuilding Day. Graham joined a few other Rebuilding Together national office staffers to help Rebuilding Together of Washington, D.C. “I had known we had a great mission, but it was great seeing a smiling face to it.” Graham helped paint, install energy efficient light bulbs, and repair a porch.
Graham said Matt de Ferranti, the senior director of government relations, has acted as a mentor for him. “He has been a large reason for being where I am,” said Graham. “He’s always imparting a little bit of wisdom.”
Graham doesn’t see his research in housing issues and poverty as just benefiting his department alone. “So much research has provided justification for our work. I think I could apply that to fundraising.”
One fact that Graham has found that sticks with him is that there are 25 million low income homeowners. “There’s a major focus in poverty and rental. People think that people who own a home are well off financially. Low-income homeowners struggle to meet day to day needs.”
Graham’s very excited about the opportunities Rebuilding Together affiliates will have when our 2014 conference meets in D.C. A “Hill Day” is planned for affiliates to go to Capitol Hill to tell their representative their story. “There are strong advocates in Congress for low-income homeowners,” said Graham. “We have champions fighting every day for programs that assist them.”

Meet Graham MacDonald!

Graham is Rebuilding Together’s research and policy specialist, working in the Government Affairs Department. 

He grew up in a small rural community called Quincy in Illinois. Graham then went on to study public policy at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In fact, he’s one of a few UNC alumni in Rebuilding Together’s national office.

Graham currently lives in Washington, D.C. He said his favorite spot is Meridian Hill Park. But if he isn’t enjoying the views there, you can probably find this big music fan in his kitchen or listening to music through his favorite speakers. 

Graham said that policy making has always been an interest of his. While never really knowing anyone who did policy work for a living, Graham’s family was very politically engaged. 

Last summer, Graham started as Rebuilding Together’s research and policy intern. “I loved the internship,” Graham said. “It gave me great experience on The Hill.  I got to taste everything Rebuilding Together does.”

Graham became the research and policy specialist just a few months ago. “I like it a lot,” said Graham. “I get the policy and research experience. I get to experience project planning and inviting elected officials to projects.” Graham was even able to sit down with Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) and talk about Rebuilding Together’s mission. 

His first time being a part of the revitalization side of Rebuilding Together happened this past National Rebuilding Day. Graham joined a few other Rebuilding Together national office staffers to help Rebuilding Together of Washington, D.C. “I had known we had a great mission, but it was great seeing a smiling face to it.” Graham helped paint, install energy efficient light bulbs, and repair a porch.

Graham said Matt de Ferranti, the senior director of government relations, has acted as a mentor for him. “He has been a large reason for being where I am,” said Graham. “He’s always imparting a little bit of wisdom.”

Graham doesn’t see his research in housing issues and poverty as just benefiting his department alone. “So much research has provided justification for our work. I think I could apply that to fundraising.”

One fact that Graham has found that sticks with him is that there are 25 million low income homeowners. “There’s a major focus in poverty and rental. People think that people who own a home are well off financially. Low-income homeowners struggle to meet day to day needs.”

Graham’s very excited about the opportunities Rebuilding Together affiliates will have when our 2014 conference meets in D.C. A “Hill Day” is planned for affiliates to go to Capitol Hill to tell their representative their story. “There are strong advocates in Congress for low-income homeowners,” said Graham. “We have champions fighting every day for programs that assist them.”

Meet Hillary Bundy! 
Hillary Bundy, a program manager at Rebuilding Together’s National Office, has spent the last four years working in almost every facet Rebuilding Together has to offer.
Born in Oklahoma, Hillary grew up in a small town in Texas. However, she considers both states her home.
Hillary went to George Washington University where she majored in international affairs and concentrated in contemporary cultures and society. She sees her studies in social cultural anthropology going hand in hand with her work with Rebuilding Together’s affiliates and community development. And she’s in good company. A surprisingly high number of anthropologists have found their way to Rebuilding Together’s National Office.
She started at Rebuilding Together as the green housing intern in June of 2009 and held that position until May 2010. Soon after, she began her term of service with CapacityCorps at Rebuilding Together Oklahoma City. She made her way back to the national office in the summer of 2011 as the office specialist. She quickly transitioned to program associate for the grants team and has recently been promoted to program manager.
As for the differences between the National Office and the Affiliate Network, Hillary said, “We see things nationally. We try to help the entire network. Affiliates see their community and try to understand how national things affect them.”
Hillary’s favorite Rebuilding Together moment is her NBA Cares Day of Service experience while serving as a CapacityCorps member. She worked alongside the Oklahoma City Thunder players. The players affectionately called her “The Boss Lady.” Hillary joked, “Apparently, I run a tight volunteer ship.”
Hillary said she sees Tiffanie Kinney, Rebuilding Together’s affiliate relations director of central regions, as a source of inspiration. Tiffanie was Hillary’s supervisor when she was an intern. “Tiffanie has a wealth of Rebuilding Together knowledge. She knows the sponsors and affiliates really well.”
Tim Reardon, program director for Rebuilding Together Oklahoma City, also served as a mentor for Hillary. “Tim really helped me grow professionally. He was supportive, always wanted to hear more, and was a great provider of constructive feedback.” She especially admired how much Tim believed in CapacityCorps. Hillary said that Tim always wanted new ideas from the young people in the community. Hillary last heard from Tim not too long ago when he sent her a congratulations note for her recent promotion.

When not helping Rebuilding Together affiliates, Hillary sings in a competitive karaoke league. We had to know what theme song she would give to Rebuilding Together. After some thought, Hillary said, “We Built This City.” Sounds perfect to us. 

Meet Hillary Bundy! 

Hillary Bundy, a program manager at Rebuilding Together’s National Office, has spent the last four years working in almost every facet Rebuilding Together has to offer.

Born in Oklahoma, Hillary grew up in a small town in Texas. However, she considers both states her home.

Hillary went to George Washington University where she majored in international affairs and concentrated in contemporary cultures and society. She sees her studies in social cultural anthropology going hand in hand with her work with Rebuilding Together’s affiliates and community development. And she’s in good company. A surprisingly high number of anthropologists have found their way to Rebuilding Together’s National Office.

She started at Rebuilding Together as the green housing intern in June of 2009 and held that position until May 2010. Soon after, she began her term of service with CapacityCorps at Rebuilding Together Oklahoma City. She made her way back to the national office in the summer of 2011 as the office specialist. She quickly transitioned to program associate for the grants team and has recently been promoted to program manager.

As for the differences between the National Office and the Affiliate Network, Hillary said, “We see things nationally. We try to help the entire network. Affiliates see their community and try to understand how national things affect them.”

Hillary’s favorite Rebuilding Together moment is her NBA Cares Day of Service experience while serving as a CapacityCorps member. She worked alongside the Oklahoma City Thunder players. The players affectionately called her “The Boss Lady.” Hillary joked, “Apparently, I run a tight volunteer ship.”

Hillary said she sees Tiffanie Kinney, Rebuilding Together’s affiliate relations director of central regions, as a source of inspiration. Tiffanie was Hillary’s supervisor when she was an intern. “Tiffanie has a wealth of Rebuilding Together knowledge. She knows the sponsors and affiliates really well.”

Tim Reardon, program director for Rebuilding Together Oklahoma City, also served as a mentor for Hillary. “Tim really helped me grow professionally. He was supportive, always wanted to hear more, and was a great provider of constructive feedback.” She especially admired how much Tim believed in CapacityCorps. Hillary said that Tim always wanted new ideas from the young people in the community. Hillary last heard from Tim not too long ago when he sent her a congratulations note for her recent promotion.

When not helping Rebuilding Together affiliates, Hillary sings in a competitive karaoke league. We had to know what theme song she would give to Rebuilding Together. After some thought, Hillary said, “We Built This City.” Sounds perfect to us. 

Meet Susan Hawfield!
Susan Hawfield has recently rejoined Rebuilding Together’s National Office after spending the better part of 10 years at Rebuilding Together Montgomery County. She started out as the director of program services and served as the executive director for six years after that. She is our new senior director of affiliate relations.
Susan currently calls Kensington, Maryland, home, but she is originally from North Carolina.
A graduate from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Susan started at Rebuilding Together in September of 1999 as a program associate in the National Office’s Program Department.
When asked why she transitioned from the National Office to the Affiliate Network, Susan said, “It looked like the affiliate network was having great fun. I wanted to implement the mission on the ground. I appreciated how difficult it was to have so many moving parts to the mission. The work was worth it in the end because the person had a safer and healthier home.”
What made her want to come back to the National Office? “I learned a lot working for an affiliate for nine plus years. It was awesome. The opportunity to help the affiliate network was a challenge I could bring insight to. I never had a job where I didn’t need a lot of training,” said Susan.
Susan has plenty of favorite Rebuilding Together moments. One being an elderly woman who Susan said she always carries in her heart. The woman was in her 90s and lived with her middle aged son who had a developmental disability. Susan described their home as modest with almost no food. Lawn furniture was used for living room furniture. The ceiling of their second floor was completely collapsed. The homeowner told Susan, “I would have ended up in a shelter if it wasn’t for Rebuilding Together Montgomery County.” Despite everything, Susan said the homeowner was the happiest person she ever met. She even discovered that she and the homeowner shared the same hometown in North Carolina.
A volunteer that has really inspired her is Jerry Liu. He’s been helping his neighbors with Rebuilding Together Montgomery County for over 20 years. In fact, he’s heading to Brooklyn with Rebuilding Together to help survivors of Hurricane Sandy.
Rebuilding Together’s National Office is very excited to have Susan onboard!

Meet Susan Hawfield!

Susan Hawfield has recently rejoined Rebuilding Together’s National Office after spending the better part of 10 years at Rebuilding Together Montgomery County. She started out as the director of program services and served as the executive director for six years after that. She is our new senior director of affiliate relations.

Susan currently calls Kensington, Maryland, home, but she is originally from North Carolina.

A graduate from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Susan started at Rebuilding Together in September of 1999 as a program associate in the National Office’s Program Department.

When asked why she transitioned from the National Office to the Affiliate Network, Susan said,It looked like the affiliate network was having great fun. I wanted to implement the mission on the ground. I appreciated how difficult it was to have so many moving parts to the mission. The work was worth it in the end because the person had a safer and healthier home.”

What made her want to come back to the National Office? “I learned a lot working for an affiliate for nine plus years. It was awesome. The opportunity to help the affiliate network was a challenge I could bring insight to. I never had a job where I didn’t need a lot of training,” said Susan.

Susan has plenty of favorite Rebuilding Together moments. One being an elderly woman who Susan said she always carries in her heart. The woman was in her 90s and lived with her middle aged son who had a developmental disability. Susan described their home as modest with almost no food. Lawn furniture was used for living room furniture. The ceiling of their second floor was completely collapsed. The homeowner told Susan, “I would have ended up in a shelter if it wasn’t for Rebuilding Together Montgomery County.” Despite everything, Susan said the homeowner was the happiest person she ever met. She even discovered that she and the homeowner shared the same hometown in North Carolina.

A volunteer that has really inspired her is Jerry Liu. He’s been helping his neighbors with Rebuilding Together Montgomery County for over 20 years. In fact, he’s heading to Brooklyn with Rebuilding Together to help survivors of Hurricane Sandy.

Rebuilding Together’s National Office is very excited to have Susan onboard!

A Message from John L. Fiegel: Midwest Natural Disasters

Dear Rebuilding Together Supporters,

On behalf of the Rebuilding Together Network, I would like to extend our thoughts and prayers to our families, friends, and neighbors experiencing devastating losses due to the tornadoes in Oklahoma and the recent and continued severe storms and flooding in the Midwest.

Rebuilding Together has been in communication with affiliate leaders from affected areas and assessing needs and capacity. We are also communicating with agencies such as NVOAD (National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster), which is coordinating an effective and efficient response as part of the larger disaster recovery community.

Rebuilding Together recognizes the critical need to assist those whose homes have been damaged or destroyed by natural disasters. As a national nonprofit working to provide safe and healthy housing for low-income homeowners, we know all too well that they are among the most vulnerable in times of disaster and have the most limited resources when it comes time to rebuild.

To be clear, Rebuilding Together is not a first responder organization. There are many other dedicated and hardworking organizations who are experts in addressing the immediate and short term needs of communities that have found themselves in harm’s way. We have joined with these organizations as a member of NVOAD to represent and address the long-term recovery needs faced by our homeowners and the communities where they live.

We will need your immediate and continuing support. We are accepting donations for our Disaster Recovery fund in anticipation of massive and ongoing rebuilding needs in Oklahoma. Community starts at home; please help us help others as they work to rebuild.

We also want to thank our many dedicated corporate and community partners, whose generosity supports our ability to serve all of our homeowners.

Please visit www.rebuildingtogether.org/disaster to learn more about how you can help.

Sincerely yours,

John L. Fiegel

Interim president & CEO

Rebuilding Together

In honor of Women’s History Month, we spoke to a few of our exceptional female leaders to get their thoughts on their careers, their communities, the women who have inspired them, and their advice to women trying to make it in the nonprofit world. 
Pam Howe, a board member of Rebuilding Together Peoria, first got involved with Rebuilding Together through volunteering. After finding her volunteer experience so rewarding, she joined Peoria’s Project Selection Committee in 1995. She has been with Rebuilding Together Peoria ever since serving in several roles.
Amy Hoyte, Executive Director of Rebuilding Together South Sound, joined Rebuilding Together through what she called “a lovely mistake.” She quit her previous job during her maternity leave and was searching for an administrative job with a construction company. A friend of hers led her to Rebuilding Together South Sound. After a couple weeks, “Rebuilding Together South Sound became my second baby,” said Amy. And it’s been her second baby for 8 years. 
Julie Smith, Executive Director of Rebuilding Together Central Ohio, saw her first Rebuilding Together project in 1996 while she worked with kids in social services. Her husband was one of the first volunteers her affiliate saw in 1991. She became the Executive Director in 1998. 
The Impact
All of these leaders have a story to tell about how a homeowner or volunteer affected them. 
Two of Pam’s service recipients and their families come out to volunteer for Rebuilding Together Peoria every year on National Rebuild Day. She finds constant inspiration from them. “They have encountered circumstances beyond their control that leave them with physical or financial limitations. Such limitations have not jaded or impeded their willingness to help others, and I will not let the daily challenges or stresses in my life jade or impede me.”
A family Amy met in the beginning of her time with Rebuilding Together still holds a place in her heart. A couple with two teenage boys just had a baby born with severe disabilities. The mother quit her job to care for their child, which significantly impacted their income. The father had to ignore calls from work at night regarding mandatory overtime because they’d lose their Medicaid benefits if he worked too much, which was how they could afford the specialized food their child needed to eat.
 “There was no way to describe the feeling in that house that day for me,” said Amy, a new mom herself at the time. “It hit home and I knew that I would be doing this work for a long time.”
Julie said her volunteers make it impossible not to be happy with her work when they are so happy to be there. “They’re talented and willing to share with each other and our homeowners. It’s the best training grounds for people who want to be homeowners.” 
You Can’t Do it Alone
None of these women take sole credit for their successes.
“One role model has been Mother Theresa and her Missionaries of Charity vow to give wholehearted and free service to the poorest of the poor,” said Pam. “My professional role model has been my own mother, who successfully balanced family life and full-time employment at a time when female employment outside the home was not widely accepted. My Rebuilding Together role model was former Vice President for Affiliate Relations, Melissa Flynn, whose ability to convert passion into action I strive to emulate within my affiliate.”
Amy thanks her mother and teachers she had growing up for nurturing her and allowing her the opportunities to make mistakes and to learn from them. She also draws inspiration from Melissa Flynn and Amy Radachi in the Rebuilding Together Network for their long-term dedication to the cause.
Julie credits her father and her family for her success. Her sister has worked with Rebuilding Together as well for 9 years and her husband has been a constant volunteer.
Advice to Women Working in Nonprofits
“Seek out as many different types of experiences as possible at first, to help determine what it is that they are passionate about.” – Amy
“Embrace the cause and let it guide all decisions and actions. Surround yourself with talented people. Develop relationships with a diverse network of advisors and centers of influence.” – Pam
“Stick to your mission. Know your mission. You have to look at it like a for profit. It’s not easy, but it’s worth it. Nonprofit is still a woman’s world. It’s one place we are truly equal.” - Julie

In honor of Women’s History Month, we spoke to a few of our exceptional female leaders to get their thoughts on their careers, their communities, the women who have inspired them, and their advice to women trying to make it in the nonprofit world.

Pam Howe, a board member of Rebuilding Together Peoria, first got involved with Rebuilding Together through volunteering. After finding her volunteer experience so rewarding, she joined Peoria’s Project Selection Committee in 1995. She has been with Rebuilding Together Peoria ever since serving in several roles.

Amy Hoyte, Executive Director of Rebuilding Together South Sound, joined Rebuilding Together through what she called “a lovely mistake.” She quit her previous job during her maternity leave and was searching for an administrative job with a construction company. A friend of hers led her to Rebuilding Together South Sound. After a couple weeks, “Rebuilding Together South Sound became my second baby,” said Amy. And it’s been her second baby for 8 years.

Julie Smith, Executive Director of Rebuilding Together Central Ohio, saw her first Rebuilding Together project in 1996 while she worked with kids in social services. Her husband was one of the first volunteers her affiliate saw in 1991. She became the Executive Director in 1998.

The Impact

All of these leaders have a story to tell about how a homeowner or volunteer affected them.

Two of Pam’s service recipients and their families come out to volunteer for Rebuilding Together Peoria every year on National Rebuild Day. She finds constant inspiration from them. “They have encountered circumstances beyond their control that leave them with physical or financial limitations. Such limitations have not jaded or impeded their willingness to help others, and I will not let the daily challenges or stresses in my life jade or impede me.”

A family Amy met in the beginning of her time with Rebuilding Together still holds a place in her heart. A couple with two teenage boys just had a baby born with severe disabilities. The mother quit her job to care for their child, which significantly impacted their income. The father had to ignore calls from work at night regarding mandatory overtime because they’d lose their Medicaid benefits if he worked too much, which was how they could afford the specialized food their child needed to eat.

 “There was no way to describe the feeling in that house that day for me,” said Amy, a new mom herself at the time. “It hit home and I knew that I would be doing this work for a long time.”

Julie said her volunteers make it impossible not to be happy with her work when they are so happy to be there. “They’re talented and willing to share with each other and our homeowners. It’s the best training grounds for people who want to be homeowners.”

You Can’t Do it Alone

None of these women take sole credit for their successes.

“One role model has been Mother Theresa and her Missionaries of Charity vow to give wholehearted and free service to the poorest of the poor,” said Pam. “My professional role model has been my own mother, who successfully balanced family life and full-time employment at a time when female employment outside the home was not widely accepted. My Rebuilding Together role model was former Vice President for Affiliate Relations, Melissa Flynn, whose ability to convert passion into action I strive to emulate within my affiliate.”

Amy thanks her mother and teachers she had growing up for nurturing her and allowing her the opportunities to make mistakes and to learn from them. She also draws inspiration from Melissa Flynn and Amy Radachi in the Rebuilding Together Network for their long-term dedication to the cause.

Julie credits her father and her family for her success. Her sister has worked with Rebuilding Together as well for 9 years and her husband has been a constant volunteer.

Advice to Women Working in Nonprofits

“Seek out as many different types of experiences as possible at first, to help determine what it is that they are passionate about.” – Amy

“Embrace the cause and let it guide all decisions and actions. Surround yourself with talented people. Develop relationships with a diverse network of advisors and centers of influence.” – Pam

“Stick to your mission. Know your mission. You have to look at it like a for profit. It’s not easy, but it’s worth it. Nonprofit is still a woman’s world. It’s one place we are truly equal.” - Julie

Need some inspiration? Here’s a look at some of our favorite quotes from the homeowners we’ve helped. 
“I thank Rebuilding Together every day of my life. I love all those volunteers. I appreciate them and my heart goes out to them wherever they may be.” - Andrea Spencer.
“I love how family oriented Rebuilding Together is…I almost lost my home. I feel like I need to give back.” - Felicia Byrd. 
“My experience with all of you is much better than winning the lottery! Money is great, but it pales in comparison to the kindness shown to me. Money runs out, but I will be to remember what you did for me well into my old age” - Janelle Weikum.
"I am not a crier but looking at my house and knowing what those men did  for me, tugs at my heart and brings tears to my eyes." - A homeowner helped by Rebuilding Together Central Ohio.
“It’s a God send, I am so grateful for the help. I can just cry, knowing that there are people who want to help make my home better.” - Ms. Purnell.

Need some inspiration? Here’s a look at some of our favorite quotes from the homeowners we’ve helped. 

“I thank Rebuilding Together every day of my life. I love all those volunteers. I appreciate them and my heart goes out to them wherever they may be.” - Andrea Spencer.

I love how family oriented Rebuilding Together is…I almost lost my home. I feel like I need to give back.” - Felicia Byrd. 

My experience with all of you is much better than winning the lottery! Money is great, but it pales in comparison to the kindness shown to me. Money runs out, but I will be to remember what you did for me well into my old age” - Janelle Weikum.

"I am not a crier but looking at my house and knowing what those men did  for me, tugs at my heart and brings tears to my eyes." - A homeowner helped by Rebuilding Together Central Ohio.

It’s a God send, I am so grateful for the help. I can just cry, knowing that there are people who want to help make my home better.” - Ms. Purnell.